Thu March 18 16:00 - 18:00
Spring School panel

On the Edge of a New Dark Age. Media Ecology and Art Strategies

Daniel Bassan Petry

Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul

Irene Pipicelli

Art Curator, Università degli studi di Torino

Michael Brodski

Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Temenuga Trifonova

York University

-

Capitalism and Software Pace at 19th Century Photographic Process: The Tension at Producing Cyanotype while Merging Analog and Digital Techniques

Based on Flusser’s propositions we can understand the digital image as a different and unique process as compared to analog. The proposal of the research was to analyze images that demand a certain amount of time to be produced, but as time went by with an effort to be as effective as possible with scarce resources available, we had to adopt shortcuts in the production of images, and our intention to work with handcrafted images rapidly became production centered. That seems to be a reflection of the current software age, in which capitalistic logics attracts us to fast solutions which rapidly blurs the initial goals. In an unnecessary desire for faster results and sharper images the project lost its initial track, allowing us to perceive how current social logics affect the production of art, even at the experimental environment of a cultural and artistic education center. 

Daniel Bassan Petry

Daniel Bassan Petry is a full-time professor and researcher of Communication and Cinema at the Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IFRS) in Brazil. Graduated in Cinema (2010), has both masters (2013) and PhD (2017) in Sciences of Communication. Currently interested in researching memory, new media and software, with past researches in themes including visual effects, new hollywood and software through a media archaeological approach. Head of research of the Alvorada campus of the IFRS (2017-2019). In 2015 released the book “Efeitos Visuais e Softwares: O cinema da Nova Hollywood” (Visual effects and softwares, the cinema of the new hollywood).

-

Hacking Surveillance: Radical Imagination as Subversive Strategy for Queer Subjectivities

In this paper I would like to discuss the relevance of the art installation 3x3x6 (2019) by the Taiwanese artist Shu Lea Cheang in opening subversive strategies. The artwork, presented by the queer pioneer in the field of new media art within the collateral program of the 58th Venice Biennale was curated by philosopher and curator Paul B. Preciado and is a significant example of strategies of media-resistance to neo-liberal politics of exclusion and control of queer subjectivities and of commodification and datification. The work is an ironic actualization of the Benthamian Panopticon in a society that hides powerful normalizing tools under an apparent libertarianism. As Shu Lea Cheang's installation suggests through the artistic remediation of a real scenario, queer theory and practice hybridized with hacktivism open a space for recognition, retraction and potential subversion of these multifaceted control dynamics. 

Irene Pipicelli

Irene Pipicelli is a PhD student in Performing Arts at the State University of Turin. She works across the fields of performance studies, media studies, and philosophy. Her research focuses on queer temporalities and radical artistic practices, crossing feminist materialism and media-archaeological perspectives. She’s working on the relationship between documentation and performativity within contemporary dance practices, under the supervision of Prof. Alessandro Pontremoli. She is a member of Performing Identities Seminar, permanent research seminar of the State University of Milan. Since 2019 she works as a curator for CROSS Project, centre for contemporary performing practices based in Northern Italy.

-

Contemporary Media Ecologies of Childhood. An Ethical Approach

This paper argues how an interdisciplinary synthesis between childhood studies - especially a therein new proclaimed “ethical turn“ (see e.g. Gubar 2013) - and approaches in film and media theory concerning affectivity can enlighten artistic strategies of contemporary media ecologies confronting the involvement in medially represented childhood. Despite a dominant (and often justified) heterological approach to the figure of the child portrayed in contemporary media, highlighting it as being a projection screen for dominant adult discourses such as nostalgia and moral panics (see e.g. Kincaid 1998, Lury 2018), it will be instead argued how contemporary media technologies can reshape our approach to childhood binary via addressing and involving us affectively.

Michael Brodski

Michael Brodski is a PhD student writing on cinematic representations of childhood and child figures at the University of Mainz (Germany) where he also worked as an associate lecturer. Michael holds a MA in Film Studies and a BA in Film Studies and Philosophy. His main research interests include childhood studies, children’s film and intermedial representations of childhood and children’s culture, affect theory, Soviet and Russian cinema and culture, as well as cinematic portrayals of remembrance.

-

Approaching the Sublime Affect from the Standpoint of Media Ecology

Over the last couple of decades media scholars and art critics have been hard at work to define the sublime negatively by identifying what it is not. As a result there has been a steady proliferation of ‘fake’ sublimes that simulate the sublime without actually being it. My paper will consider a few representative instances of this slippage between ‘real’ and ‘fake’ sublime and the definitional difficulties brought about by it: 1) the environmental sublime; 2) the CGI sublime; 3) the immersive sublime; 4) the fetishization of the detail as sublime; 5) the forlorn sublime; and 6) the data sublime. 

Temenuga Trifonova

Temenuga Trifonova teaches Cinema and Media Studies at York University. She is the author of The Figure of the Migrant in Contemporary European Cinema (forthcoming from Bloomsbury, 2020), Warped Minds: Cinema and Psychopathology (Amsterdam UP, 2014), The Image in French Philosophy (Rodopi, 2007) and editor/contributor of Contemporary Visual Culture and the Sublime (Routledge, 2017) and European Film Theory (Routledge, 2008). She has been Marie Curie research fellow at Le Studium Centre for Advanced Studies (France), and a visiting scholar at the Waseda Institute for Advanced Studies in Tokyo, the NYU Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, the American Academy in Rome, the University of Bologna, and the Brown Foundation at the Dora Maar House (France).